Velieris

Tucked away in an industrial pocket of Braybrook, Velieris manufacture beautiful carpets and rugs. I visited because they offer scouring as a service to other textile businesses.

Fibre first

Rocco, the production manager showed me around on the day. We started in the scouring room, which was piled high with bales of fibre. Velieris buys wool and alpaca fibre from co-ops who gather local fibre in a central location. The fibre is sorted for quality, length and colour at the co-op, then delivered to Melbourne. Velieris also buys fibre from Peru and NZ to make up the quantities they need.

Scoured fibre

Scoured fibre

The company scours for doona and pillow manufacturers, local processers and UK spinning mills. Velieris accept orders between 1000-50kg, which makes their service accessible to smaller players.

Clean it up

Bubbles!

Bubbles!

Velieris use an eco soap in their scouring bowls. The first four bowls have soap; their water is steam heated. Effluent from scouring goes through their water treatment plant to remove the soap. Some chemicals are used at this stage. They also need to cool the water down before it is released. Their sludge, all the dirt removed in scouring, goes into landfill.

Water treatment

Water treatment

At this stage, if the fibre has been processed for an external company, Rocco bales the scoured fibres up and sends them off. All the carpet fibre moves to the next stage of mixing, carding and combing.

Mix it up

Velieris specialise in luxury naturally coloured products. They use a weighing machine to mix colour ‘recipes’. Eliminating the dying process reduces water usage and retains the softness of the wool and alpaca fibres Velieris use.

Weighing machine (green, on left) and carder (grey box on right)

Weighing machine (green, on left) and carder (grey box on right)

There’s no need for dehairing, because this fibre is destined for carpet. The fibres are sucked into a huge carding machine, then transfered to combers. Melbourne’s manufacturing history feels very close when you’re standing next to these old, but still powerful machines.

Combing machines

Combing machines

The combed fibres are gilled twice to even them out before spinning. I loved watching the fibre snake up into the gilling machine!

The resulting slivers are then spun and plyed into carpet yarn. The yarn is tufted before heading to the loom to be woven into carpet. Velieris do moth proof their carpets, but they are happy to skip this step at the customer’s request.

Weaving it together

Carpet maker

Carpet loom

The carpet loom is a thing of wonder. I couldn’t capture it all in a photo, so I’ll try to describe it. You have the loom up one end of the factory of course, but what you see is more like a yarn blood system. Leading into the loom are about 10 metal frames. Each frame holds about 10 cones of yarn. Each cone of yarn is strung through the frame, to the loom to make the warp. The whole system takes up about 15 square metres. It’s impressive.

Once woven, the carpet gets checked over by hand for any blemishes like loose threads. It’s trimmed to create a neat consistent top, then sent off for backing. Velieris makes the carpet entirely at their Braybrook workshop, except for the latex backing. This is done by an external specialist in Melbourne because it’s cheaper.

Checking for blemishes

Checking for blemishes

Side line

There was one row of spinning machines that weren’t running when I visited. These machines were bought in error – they are fine yarn spinners. Rocco’s been experimenting with them to get a good product to attract a buyer with. He can get a 270 tex yarn. He’s met a group interested in returning fine yarn spinning to Melbourne, but they don’t yet have the skills to use the machinery. Will we see fine yarns in this Fibreshed again one day?

Carpet and fine yarn samples from Velieris

Carpet and fine yarn samples from Velieris


Fibershed community: Visiting the Handweavers & Spinners Guild of Victoria

I never knew there was a Handweavers and Spinners Guild in Victoria. I had assumed the little shop front near my home with hand knits displayed in the front window was the local yarn store. Not knowing where to begin with my Fibershed project, I decided to start here and see if they had any advice for me.

What’s inside?

The shop is set up in several different layers – there is the members’ gallery/shop area at the front where pieces made by their members are displayed and available for purchase. Directly behind that is a space available for many of their guild’s gatherings; there was a weaving group working there during my visit.

I was amazed at the range and diversity of groups that the guild supported. They have spinning and weaving groups of course, but also natural dying, tapestry and Japanese braiding. A kind volunteer took the time to introduce me to all of their activities, including their yearly retreat in Harrietville, the much anticipated Textile Bazaar (a rummage sale of second-hand yarns and equipment donated to the guild) and regular classes during the year in installments and held as intensives during summer when country members are more likely to be able to join in.

But wait, there’s more!

Beyond the first couple of visible sections, the shop revealed far more than I’d been able to see from the street: behind a partition on the left, there was a gallery area for temporary exhibitions. At the time I visited it was full of textiles from Bhutan, but I have to go back because the current display is of socks in all different designs.

Along the back wall there was a members library full of books, periodicals, newsletters, videos, DVDs and slides. There was also a doorway to a back room, which I think had sink facilities for the natural dyeing group.

On the right behind another partition, there is a resources shop with some balls of wool like I’m used to, but also spinning tools, dye bottles, resource books and tops. Now, here is where I had to learn something, and the knowledgeable shop manager helped me out. Tops are fleece that has been shorn and trimmed down to the best fibre. They can be bought washed or unwashed, dyed or in natural colours. They’re your starting point for spinning or felting and so naturally the guild’s store was full of a variety of tops!

Talking to those who know

I got confirmation that there are wool growers in Victoria (and the far east of South Australia, within the boundary of my project) whom I could buy tops from. The store manager explained that the wool needs to be scoured (washed) to remove oils, lanolin and dirt. There is only one commercial scourer in Victoria (it seems like wool mills might have their own though?) and you need to have a licence to scour wool because it can be quite a polluting process. I’ll also then need to get my top carded (brushed).

The guild members I spoke to suggested I look into felting, otherwise I’ll need to get the fibre spun into yarn for weaving or knitting/crochet. It’s food for thought, and I have very little experience in knitting and weaving, and none at all in felting or spinning so perhaps I can work with some guild members on this project.