Down the quiet roads of country NSW, a quiet revolution is occuring. Alpaca breeder Tanya Boston had fallen in love with her alpacas, but didn’t know what to do with their fleece. She asked around at shows: what did others do? “It’s in the shed” was the regular reply. So Tanya decided to do something about it.

After 18 months of research, Tanya and her husband Jim decided to purchase a Mini Mill from Belfast Mini-Mills in Canada.  Following some intensive training and another 12 months of practice, Tanya opened her own mini mill. She mostly services southern NSW and ACT, but has also delivered to Queensland, Northern NSW, Victoria, Western Australia and Tasmania. Boston Fine Fibres processes batts and roving and yarn from 2-8 ply for breeders to sell under their own name. Jim knits beanies from the yarn to sell at farmers’ markets, while Tanya’s rug yarn and lopi are very popular.

Being a mini mill, it’s possible for Tanya to process small orders – orders as small as a single saddle. It’s a time consuming process though. There are 12 pieces of machinery the fibre needs to pass through during processing, a journey that takes around 4 days to complete each fleece. There’s also the four hour downtime whenever Tanya cleans the equipment to change fibre colours. Tanya’s background in quality control and quality assurance is evident in the care she takes to trace each order throughout the process.

The mill runs entirely on roof-harvested rainwater and solar electricity. Because alpaca wool doesn’t contain lanolin, like sheep’s wool,  Tanya is able to use a gentle detergent and all the mill’s grey water can be recycled to their orchard and paddock. Sustainability has been considered in the mill’s packaging, too: Tanya uses tissue paper and brown bags in preference to plastics.

A big part of Tanya’s work is education. She works with her clients and shearers to help them understand what she needs to get the best out of the fibre. A fleece can lose up to 20-30% of its weight during processing, depending on variables such as how it was skirted. She maintains an open invite to clients and community groups to come visit the mill and learn about the process. She will also provide advice on what products clients could consider making from their fibre.

Luckily for Tanya, as a mini mill operator running Belfast Mill equipment, she can access her own education network. There are 79 mills around the world using Belfast Mill equipment, each have a different approach but they all welcome each other and share information.

Tanya feels the nearby national capital of Canberra provides a good market for the region’s fibre products. After all, the climate means that people are wearing woollens for nine months of the year. The population of public service workers means a lot of black which are beautifully complemented by the range of natural alpaca accessories. Tanya sells her yarn online and though a limited number of specialty yarn retailers.   

In the future, Tanya would like to process more of her own specialty yarn. She’d blend different natural alpaca colours to create heathered and verigated yarns. She would also blend other natural fibres like llama, camel, cashmere, suri and bamboo. Blending dyed silks gives her particular pleasure “you’re really making something special”.

The Facts

Product – Semi-worsted yarns, blended yarns, rovings and batts

Maximum Capacity – 500kg/year

Min Order – 1kg

Max Order – 20kg

Staple Lengths – 50-150mm

Lead time Required for Orders – 6 months

Current Fibre Types Processed – willing to take any fibre, including suri

Prototyping Fibre Types Requests – all natural fibres welcome

Yarn Price – From $132 per incoming kilo  alpaca

Restrictions – Must be well skirted and free of vegetable matter

Water Use – all water collected and reused onsite

Waste Water Impacts – all water collected and reused onsite. Improvements made to soil lead to less runoff and greater retention.

Energy Supply: 100% Solar energy

Contact

Tanya and Jim

Phone: +61 (0) 417 497 940

Location: Queanbeyan, NSW

http://www.bostonfinefibres.com.au

This site visit was generously supported by Fibreshed California and photographed by Andrew Lance. Authored by Rachel Bucknall.